Speed dating tony herbert

Rated 4.84/5 based on 821 customer reviews

The vessel is not recorded in the 1882/83 edition, the next that I have, at least not as Thomas Wood, though it is quite possible that it was still listed there under another name had 'V. Per 1 (Board of Trade inquiry into the 1875 wreck, ex 'Accounts and Papers', published 1876, a 'Google' book).

That edition is the last Lloyd's Register record of the vessel that I have available. In subsequent years the vessel would seem to have served South America out of the ports of Liverpool & Swansea also.

13, 1875, the vessel, under the command of Alexander Oppen & with a crew of 13 all told, left Demerera, (South America, now Guyana) bound for London with a general cargo.

The entire crew took to a longboat which stood by Madeline for a while, lost sight of her in a squall, & never saw her again.

The only image I have seen so far, related to the yard at all, is an image of Mr. Fireside, built in 1942, is beside her & Borde, built in 1953, is the ship in the near left rear. Can anybody advise re the origin of what is a truly fine image. The first image on this 'pdf' page (thanks City of Sunderland! Marwood's North of England Register of 1854 still records the vessel as registered at Sunderland & owned by Thos. LR of 1874/75 thru 1876/77, records the vessel as owned by 'Bedlington', while LR of 1876/77 notes that the vessel had been 'Wrecked'. 5, 1876, Mora, then owned by 'Isaac Bedlington and others' & registered at WH, with Henry Beane ('Beane') in command, left Hartlepool with a cargo of 308 tons of coal for Flemsburg, (Flensburg, Germany, I believe), with a crew of 6 all told. 16, 1876, the vessel sighted Ohlenborg Light, but the light was only occasionally visible as the weather at the time was thick & the wind was blowing hard. it struck Puttgarden Reef (off Puttgarden, Germany & Femern island). Per 1 (data, Birch Grove - 1872), 2 (converted into a lighter in 1888), 3 (Sir John Grice, 'John Grice & Co.'), 4 (towed out to sea in 1932).

speed dating tony herbert-67

And in 1874/75 Lloyd's Register, the owner is recorded as being G. The main Austin yard would however seem to have been just a short distance away, on the same bank & a little closer to the sea. Names of just a few of the vessels constructed by 'Austin' of Sunderland - added as I happen to spot references to them. A sign at the site today, shown here (& in the image strip above), in an Alan Collie image, advises us that the pontoon was towed half way around the world to a shipyard in Hong Kong a year or so after the 'Austin' ship building yard was closed. Now it is really not for the webmaster to criticise from afar re such matters, but the sign looks to my eye to be have been 'low budget' - a more distinguished sign, perhaps illustrating the pontoon, might better have been commissioned in the first place to commemorate such a significant part of the city's history. Anyway, in 1826 he changed occupations & started a ship repair facility on North Sands 'with a repair slipway up which the ships were hauled by capstans worked by horses'. The word 'graving' was used, but perhaps is no longer used, to refer to the cleaning of a ship's bottom, the term being derived, perhaps from a French word which meant 'beach'.) I am advised that that graving dock is still there today - in Jun. Re-registered in 1919 as a lighter by 'Victorian Lighterage Pty. These two pages summarise what Corder wrote about the history of the many 'Austin' businesses & companies over the years, as you can see here. It would seem that the shipyard came into existence way back in 1826! Founded by Peter Austin, born in 1770, whose name this site knows because he was in 1805, I understand, a partner with Samuel Moore in the Wear Pottery & had earlier than 1805 been trained in the pottery business by Robert Fairbairns at High Pottery in Newbottle, located just a few miles away from Sunderland. Austin and Son' does not seem to make sense - where perhaps 'S. (A graving dock is, for those like me who do not know these things, is a multi-purpose dry-dock, which can be used for a variety of purposes - for new ship building, for ship repair, & for ship maintenance. In 1888, the vessel was hulked (which is this case means converted to a lighter), at Melbourne, & became 243 tons only. Name changed to Birchgrove - earlier than 1910, but was it truly so? Nicholas, of Ballarat (near Melbourne), as the then owner of the 219 ton Birch Grove.

Leave a Reply