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One winter day during my junior year, I found out that he had cheated on me again. He became enraged as I walked away to my class but he didn't follow me. In that moment, I had two choices: I could either sit there and continue to be belittled in front of everyone because he wasn't going to leave, and nobody else was going to say or do anything, or I could walk out and be shamed anyway because I had given into his threats. As we walked down the hall, he spit in my face, pulled my necklace off my neck, threw it in the trashcan and he threw me up against the lockers. Mine is a story of emotional, psychological, and physical abuse.After class had begun, I heard the door swing open, which was at the front of the classroom. He stayed at the door and looked toward the teacher and said to him in front of the whole class, "I need to speak to that fucking whore right there." He pointed at me, then he turned to me and said, "Bitch, get your fucking stupid ass out here now." Everybody turned and looked at me in shock but nobody said a word. It didn't begin immediately, in fact, there weren't any signs until we had been dating for almost a year.Unfortunately, as teens form their first romantic relationships, they often are unclear about what constitutes a healthy relationship.Often, verbal and emotional abuse erodes girls’ self-esteem, making it more difficult to summon the courage to tell someone about the abuse, let alone end the relationship.Any young person can experience dating abuse or unhealthy relationship behaviors, regardless of gender, sexual orientation, socioeconomic standing, ethnicity, religion or culture.It does not discriminate and can happen to anyone in any relationship, whether it’s one that is casual or serious. There are some warning signs that can help you identify if your relationship is unhealthy or abusive, including the examples below. metro area in need of legal help, contact Break the Cycle's legal services team.We consulted with girls around the world to better understand their personal obstacles.These girls reported, overwhelmingly, multiple challenges and sources of stress—violence, dating, peer pressure, depression, lack of self-esteem, and family or cultural expectations.

I was stuck in a psychological trap and didn't know where to turn, nobody could help me. Nobody knew I had been punched so hard I was almost knocked out.Physical abuse is dangerous but psychological abuse is deeply-rooted.In those moments, I desperately needed somebody who understood.It soon progressed to name-calling, insults, unfounded accusations, degradation, humiliation, and isolation.The first step in domestic violence is to charm the victim; the second is to isolate the victim. I began believing I deserved the abuse, and thought everybody else believed I was who he said I was.

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